California native, Dana Trippe gives a whole new meaning to the word “throwback.” Nostalgic for an era that she never got to experience first hand, Dana brings the aesthetics of the 60’s and 70’s to a new generation. As an artist, she’s not afraid to sacrifice a bit of control and convenience in the craft of her photographs. For Dana, her fascination with the era extends beyond the work she creates. The music, the art, and the philosophy of this time have been born anew into this young, creative soul. Her unwavering appreciation of originality and artistic intention makes her stand out. It’s refreshing, plain and simple. Dana’s photos are nothing less than a celebration of freedom, beauty, and, of course, love. These are the feelings that we need to dust off and reclaim today in order to ignite the era that belongs only to us.

What is your go-to camera?

Nikon F6, super fancy with all the bells and whistles…I can rely on that baby for anything. My camera family is huge, though. My other favorites are my Polaroid 600SE and Canon AE-1. Developing film will never get old, and even when I am not 100 percent happy with the results, the photos always seem to grow on me with time. digital always seems to bore me, and I’m never quite satisfied with the quality of it. [I’ve] got a love affair with film, and that’s that!

Would you say that you have a penchant for doing things the old-fashioned way? How does this carry over to other areas of your life?

When every single thing that has inspired you comes from the 60s-mid 70’s, what you do and create will surely be reflected by that. All of my friends share the same love of that aesthetic with me, so it’s easy for us to live a bit separated from the generation we’re living in.

As the 70’s aesthetic takes contemporary art and culture by storm, what facets of that era are you most excited to see resurface?

Everything from that era looks better to me. The hair, the cars, the clothes, the art, the psychedelics, and the music especially. With that said, things that come into style, usually go out of style, as well. I just hope that people don’t see such an era of creativity and experimentation as a phase, or as a trend in the form of a style of pants you can wear. A lot of good came into the art world in that time and it should be remembered for that.Are there other moments from history that fuel your creative process?

Not really any specific milestone in history, but music has definitely shaped me and my “art” more than anything. Finding a really fucking good album or a song I’ve never heard is always life changing….every single time. I can always appreciate musicians that are trying to do something different. Any group of people trying to change the world through channeling their creative sides deserve a lot of respect. Like the bands that were using lyrics to mirror the widespread feelings of the counterculture in the late 60s, or the krautrock scene…

When your inspiration needs a boost, where do you seek creative refuge?

60s and 70s magazines. Wes Anderson. Older films where the art direction is actually commendable. I watch movies whenever and wherever I can. My large family of vinyl records. Roger Dean and other amazing sci-fi influenced artists. My boyfriend, who is an insanely talented guitar player. And all my beautiful friends, whom I usually shoot.

What’s next for you?

Haven’t submerged myself into the art world as a full time career….It’s still just a hobby. Just got to keep trying to do something different than I’ve done before, but keep building on my natural aesthetic. It’s all for love and all for fun, and I never want to force it into being any more than that!

See more of Dana Trippe’s work via her website.